London Attractions

London Attractions


In 2019, more than 19 million foreigners visited London, the capital of the United Kingdom and Great Britain. In an international comparison, the metropolis is one of the most popular destinations for city travelers after Bangkok and Paris. Dozens, if not hundreds of sights await admirers on almost 1.600 square kilometers.

Our top 10 sights in London

We are particularly fond of the urban destinations listed below. We're not thinking of tourist attractions like Warner Bros. Studios or Madame Tussauds. We are fascinated by the "classic" sights such as the Tower, Buckingham Palace or Westminster Abbey. Each of our top ten favorites is worth checking out. The big advantage is that they are all easy to find.

1. Tower of London

In our Top 10 ranking, the Tower of London takes first place. In the 11th century, William the Conqueror had a fortress built on the Thames. The construction of the "Fortress of the Tower" became an ongoing process. The well-secured castle complex was the residence of the kings for centuries, and each ruler brought his own ideas. The fortress served as an armory, garrison, mint, prison and place of execution.

Tower of London
Tower of London - in the center of the tower building
Tower of London
Tower of London - a Yeoman Warder

The mighty building belongs to the British Crown. Several million onlookers visit the tower every year. They come for the British crown jewels, the legendary ravens and the Yeoman Warders dressed in period uniforms. They guard the facility and keep an eye on the ravens. The Tower belongs - how could it be otherwise - to the UNESCO world cultural heritage.
Tower of London Welcome Center - Petty Wales
Ticket price: 30 pounds (35 euros)
The Tower of London tour is not suitable for people with disabilities!

2.Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge spans the River Thames within sight of the Tower of London. The bridge was built towards the end of the 19th century. The appearance of the (apparent) stone bridge is deceptive: for optical reasons, the limestone hides the steel girders of a suspension bridge. The carriageway of the bridge is 244 meters long and can be opened to ship traffic.

Open Tower Bridge


Open Tower Bridge


Illuminated Tower Bridge in the evening light


Illuminated Tower Bridge in the evening light


To allow large ships to pass, the two sections of the roadway are folded up to an angle of 86 degrees. At these moments, vehicle traffic comes to a standstill; shipping has priority. And that with around 40.000 vehicles crossing the bridge every day. There are two walkways for pedestrians at a height of 43 meters. The webs are specified by the technology: they tension the towers and derive the tensile forces of the suspension cables. The bridge can be visited. As part of the "Tower Bridge Exhibition" the towers, the upper walkways and the old engine room are accessible.

3. Buckingham Palace

In the City of Westminster is Buckingham Palace, the residence of the Queen of England and the site of state receptions. The origins of the royal residence date back to 1703. At that time, the Duke of Buckingham had a spacious town house built. In the second half of the 18th century, King George III. purchased the building. In the years that followed, the palace was expanded to its current size. The residence has 775 rooms, 19 of which are used as state rooms.

Buckingham Palace


Buckingham Palace


Buckingham Palace Park


Buckingham Palace Park 


Buckingham Palace also includes a riding hall, horse stables, an indoor swimming pool, a tennis court and various outbuildings. The 17-hectare park with a pond and over 200 trees is also worth seeing.
The so-called State Rooms are open to visitors for ten weeks in the summer.
Ticket price: 30 British pounds.
A garden café and a souvenir shop enhance the visitor experience.

Visitors to the palace cannot fail to notice the Victoria Memorial. The Queen ruled the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1901. The memorial in front of the palace is 26 meters high. Figures and lions decorate the monument. The boulevard “The Mall” leads from the Victoria Memorial to the Admiralty Arch.

Victoria Memorial in front of Buckingham Palace


Victoria Memorial in front of Buckingham Palace


The Royal Horse Guard ride towards Admiralty Arch


The Royal Horse Guard ride towards Admiralty Arch 


4. St Paul's Cathedral

At 158 ​​meters long, St Paul's Cathedral, the episcopal church of the Church of England, is one of the largest churches in the world. The lantern resting on the dome ends at 111 meters or 365 feet. A foot for every day of the year.

St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral - Baptismal font in the nave
St Paul's Cathedral - main altar
St Paul's Cathedral - burial place in the crypt

The cathedral was built in Baroque style after London's Great Fire (1666). St Paul's Cathedral has since been the site of many ceremonies. Celebrations include state funerals or marriage ceremonies and jubilees. Numerous famous contemporaries were buried in the huge crypt of the cathedral.
Location: St Paul's Churchyard, City of London
Ticket price adults: 21 British pounds on site; Online tickets cost 18 pounds. Discounts are granted.

5.Westminster Abbey

A “rich historical place” is how Westminster Abbey presents itself online. Westminster Abbey, like the Parliament opposite, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Westminster Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066 and the burial place of more than 3.000 people.

The twin towers of Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey - Choir
Westminster Abbey - crossing
Westminster Abbey - High Altar
Westminster Abbey - Coronation Chair
Westminster Abbey - Poets' Corner
Westminster Abbey - Henry VII Chapel
Westminster Abbey - Tomb of Georgio Holles

Visitors can see the coronation chair in the church, which is over 700 years old. You will see Poets' Corner, the place of pilgrimage for literature lovers. More than 100 poets are buried or memorialized in this part of Westminster Abbey. 30 kings and queens found their befitting burial place in Westminster Abbey. Another highlight is the Lady Chapel. It is a glorious example of late medieval architecture. The nave with the main altar and the tomb of the Unknown Soldier is breathtaking. The man who died in World War I fell in France and was buried in French soil in the church. The chapter house and the cloister are also worth seeing.

Westminster Abbey - Tomb of the Unknown Soldier


Westminster Abbey - Tomb of the Unknown Soldier


Westminster Abbey - Cloisters


Westminster Abbey - Cloisters 


Location: Dean's Yard
Ticket price adults: 25 British pounds. Discounts are granted. Guided tours are offered.

6. Trafalgar Square

The City of Westminster is London's largest public square. Its history goes back to the Middle Ages. Four streets converge at this square. Trafalgar Square got its current form in the mid-19th century. Nelson's Column is in the center of the square. With the monument, the country honored Admiral Lord Nelson for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar over France and Spain. Lord Nelson was mortally wounded in the battle and was subsequently buried in St Paul's Cathedral. Nelson's Column is a symbolic 51 meters high. This figure corresponds to the overall height of Nelson's flagship "HMS Victory" from keel to top of the mast. Four huge bronze lions keep watch at the foot of the monument. The two fountains between Nelson's Column and the elevated National Gallery are tributes to Admirals Beatty and Jellicoe.

Trafalgar Square - Nelson's Column
Trafalgar Square - the lions of Nelson's Column
Trafalgar Square - the National Gallery
Trafalgar Square - fountain complex

At the four corners of the square are three more statues. The empty base in the northwest corner, the "fourth plinth", is used temporarily for the presentation of art objects. The National Gallery on the north side of the square is one of the British capital's most important art museums. To the north-east of Trafalgar Square is the church of St Martin-in-the-Fields.

Trafalgar Square - temporary artwork on the fourth plinth


Trafalgar Square - temporary artwork on the fourth plinth


Trafalgar Square with St Martin-in-the-Fields


Trafalgar Square with St Martin-in-the-Fields 


7. Piccadilly Circus

If you don't know Piccadilly Circus in the City of Westminster district with the advertising boards that have been in use for ages, you haven't seen London. The square originally linked Regent Street to Piccadilly. Piccadilly Circus has long been a meeting point for some of London's most important streets. As if that weren't enough, two underground lines cross at Piccadilly Circus.

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus


The 7th Earl of Shaftesbury was memorialized with the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain. The winged, nude figure at the top of the fountain itself represents the angel of Christian charity. Prudish, mocking Victorians renamed the figure 'Eros'. And it has remained so to this day. – The square is not only known for the “Eros”, but also for its billboards. The first panel was erected on the roof of the London Pavilion in 1900. Later, only six large billboards were allowed to be affixed to the winding corner house on Shaftesbury Avenue. Another video screen blazed from the roof of a house in Haymarket. Since mid-January 2017, a single, curved video wall has been delighting passers-by with advertising messages.

8. Covent Garden

Covent Garden Market in the West End is also a highlight of our London itinerary. Markets have been held between St Martin's Lane and Drury Lane since the early 17th century. A market hall was added in 1830. It was used until the 1960s. After the market's abandonment, Covent Garden Market launched its second career as a stylish shopping center and tourist attraction.

Covent Garden


Covent Garden


Covent Garden - The Piazza


Covent Garden - The Piazza 


In front of Covent Garden is The Piazza, a plaza with an outdoor restoration, and next to it is the Royal Opera House. It is the home of the Royal Opera and the Royal Ballet.

Covent Garden - Royal Opera House


Covent Garden - Royal Opera House


Covent Garden - rear side


Covent Garden - rear side 


9. Hyde Park

Like the adjacent Kensington Gardens, London's most famous park is a public green space. Both parks have a total area of ​​almost four square kilometers. Before it was opened to the public, Hyde Park was a royal hunting ground. Within the park is the 11 hectare Serpentine Lake. You can swim and row in it. There is a riding school and picnic areas. Large open areas are overgrown with lawn. Where there are trees, trusting gray squirrels eat out of the visitors' hands. Hyde Park is known for the "Speakers Corner". People are allowed to talk about all topics there. However, the royal family is taboo.

Footpath in Hyde Park
Hyde Park - Lake Serpentine
Hyde Park - Serpentine Bar & Kitchen
Hyde Park - Speakers Corner

The monumental "Wellington Arch" towers in the south-east of the city park. The triumphal arch was erected for the 1st Duke of Wellington, who defeated French troops at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. The battle cost 53.000 lives.

Wellington Arch

Wellington Arch


Near Speakers Corner is the Marble Arch. The marble arch originally stood in front of Buckingham Palace. Due to lack of space, it was moved to its current location in the mid-19th century.

Marble archMarble arch


10. London from above - the London Eye

The London Eye on the south bank of the Thames is an integral part of the cityscape. The largest Ferris wheel in Europe is nicknamed the "Millennium Wheel". Its height measures 135 meters. The 32 gondolas each hold 25 people. One rotation takes 30 minutes. The ride is a dreamlike experience because of the views offered. What was originally planned for five years appears to be indispensable due to its unprecedented success. To show what is technically possible in this area, let's look at that for a moment Ain Dubai, the largest Ferris wheel in the world. It is 260 meters high; a total of 48 gondolas rotate in forty minutes.

London Eye ferris wheel

London Eye ferris wheel


Sights in the districts

Our recommendations for city destinations are generally aimed at cruise ship guests and day trippers. Cities the size and breadth of London open up to visitors, borough after borough. After the top 10 mentioned above, we will now focus on the area of ​​Inner London, and specifically the city districts close to the city centre.

Things to see in the Borough of Camden

St Pancras International Station

The London district of Camden shines with its long-standing club scene and beautiful pubs. Camden is home to Covent Garden, one of our top 10 destinations. Another attraction is St Pancras International, one of several mainline railway stations in London. The confectionery-style building is an expression of the Victorian period. When completed, the Main Hall was the largest single-arched hall in the world.

St Pancras International Station


St Pancras International Station


Concourse of St Pancras International Station


Concourse of St Pancras International Station 


St Pancras is the terminus of several domestic British railway lines and at the same time the start and end point of the to Amsterdam and Paris' leading fast and comfortable Eurostar trains. The trains stop in Brussels after a two-hour journey.

Sights in the City of London borough

The smallest London borough has it all. The globally recognized financial center is the economic heart of the metropolis. The already presented St Paul's Cathedral (top 10), the Guildhall and the Bank of England are in the district. Opposite is the Stock Exchange. The Leadenhall Market is also worth seeing. The buildings mentioned are of historical origin. Architectural monuments of the recent past are the Gherkin and the Sky Garden in the "Walkie Talkie".

The Guild Hall

The term "Guildhall" stands in English for town hall or house of the guilds. In fact, the London Guildhall was used as the town hall for several centuries. The beautiful building is currently used as an event center and museum.

London Guildhall


London Guildhall


Guildhall Yard - The City of London Police Museum


Guildhall Yard - The City of London Police Museum 


Location: 71 Basinghall St

Bank of England

An eye-catcher on Threadneedle Street is the headquarters of the Bank of England. Such splendor as the United Kingdom's central bank exudes from the parliaments of other countries. We are not concerned with the Bank of England Museum at this point.

Bank of England


Bank of England


Bank of England - Portico


Bank of England - Portico 


Location: Threadneedle Street

Royal exchange

In January 1571, the first London bourse was established with the Royal Exchange. In the course of the following centuries, the building burned down completely twice. The magnificent building shines today outside and inside in the classical style. The stock exchange activities have been suspended since 2001, instead the Royal Exchange is used as a shopping center with exclusive shops. There is certainly no lack of purchasing power in the immediate vicinity.

Royal Exchange - entrance area


Royal Exchange - entrance area


Royal Exchange Courtyard


Royal Exchange Courtyard 


Location: Threadneedle Street opposite the Bank of England

Leadenhall Market

From the 14th century, poultry and cheese were traded where office buildings now stand. Wool and leather were added in the 15th century. In 1881 the market was given a cast iron and glass roof. The market atmosphere was lost; instead of market stalls, upscale shops sell everyday necessities. The beneficiaries are the well-paid employees working in the surrounding office buildings. We meet some of them in the late morning in the restaurants and bars of Leadenhall Market. On the Top: Scenes from a Harry Potter film were filmed in Leadenhall Market.

Leadenhall Market - entrance area
Leadenhall Market - ceiling construction
Leadenhall Market - clothing store
Leadenhall Market - food scene

Location: Gracechurch

Gherkin

30 St Mary Axe is the address and real name of Swiss Re's 180 meter high office and residential tower in London's financial district. The high-rise built by star architect Sir Norman Foster is disrespectfully referred to in the vernacular as “Gherkin”, which means something like gherkin. The London skyline would be unimaginable without The Gherkin. Unfortunately, the building is not open to the public. There is one exception: guests of the residents may visit the restaurant and bar on one of the top floors when accompanied by them.

Gherkin


Gherkin


London Panorama with Gherkin


London Panorama with Gherkin 


Skygarden London

A 160 meter high office tower towers on the north bank of the Thames. The skyscraper, colloquially known as the "Walkie Talkie", offers visitors the so-called Sky Garden with dozens of plants on the 35th floor over three floors. There is also a restaurant and a bar. The view of the Thames with Tower Bridge, The Shard, St Paul's Cathedral, the HMS Belfast museum ship lying in the Thames and the north of London is phenomenal.

Sky Garden London - Restaurant level
Sky Garden London - Plantings
Sky Garden London - Plantings
Panoramic view from Sky Garden London

The highlight: there is no entrance fee for the whole thing. Recommendations state that tickets should be booked online in advance. When we visited in May 2022, no prior reservation was required.
Address: 20 Fenchurch St

The nearby "Garden at 120" in the high-rise of the insurance company Generali offers a similarly beautiful and even better view of the tower. The size of the open-air garden is estimated at 285 square meters. The garden is on the 15th floor behind glass walls. As with the Sky Garden London, there is no entry fee.
Address 120 Fenchurch Street

Sights in the City of Westminster borough

Three major City of Westminster attractions make our list of top 10 places to visit: Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Trafalgar Square. Also worth seeing are the Palace of Westminster, 10 Downing Street and the Church of St Martin-in-the-Fields.

Palace of Westminster

The monumental building complex on the Thames is the seat of the British Parliament. The origins of the castle-like property, built in the neo-Gothic style, go back almost 1.000 years. The English kings initially resided in the buildings that preceded the Palace of Westminster. A major fire in 1834 destroyed the historic structure.

A bird's-eye view of the Palace of Westminster


A bird's-eye view of the Palace of Westminster


Palace of Westminster with the Elizabeth Tower


Palace of Westminster with the Elizabeth Tower 


The most striking element of the building is the clock tower with the "Big Ben" bell. Colloquially, their name is transferred to the tower structure. Officially the tower is called "Elizabeth Tower".

The Palace of Westminster consists of approximately 1.100 rooms. The most important rooms are the plenary halls of both chambers of parliament. The Palace of Westminster has been on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1987, along with neighboring Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's Church.
Guided tours take place during the parliamentary holidays (August and September).
Location: Parliament Square.

10 Downing Street

It is less than 500 meters from the Palace of Westminster to 10 Downing Street, the seat of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Since 1902, the handsome town house has also been the permanent residence of the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister's office and residence is between Horse Guards Road and Whitehall Street, well secured by high bars and police posts. Satellite images reveal the true dimensions of Britain's government headquarters.

Well secured access to 10 Downing Street


Well secured access to 10 Downing Street


Horse Guards Parade parade ground


Horse Guards Parade parade ground 


If you like, you can walk over to the “Horse Guards Parade” in a few minutes. The annual birthday ceremony for the English monarch takes place on the parade ground.

Admiralty Arch

Admiralty Arch can be seen from Buckingham Palace. The boulevard “The Mall” coming from Buckingham Palace ends at the triumphal arch built in 1910. The arch belongs to the adjoining Admiralty Complex. East of Admiralty Arch is Trafalgar Square. The structure is dominated by three massive passageways. The middle of the openings is closed to traffic. It is only opened for state files. – It has been planned for a long time to convert the building into a luxury hotel. The Waldorf Astoria Group is named as the future operator.Admiralty Arch

Admiralty Arch


National Gallery

The National Gallery in Trafalgar Square (Top 10) exhibits masterpieces from the 13th to the 19th centuries. The exhibition is one of the richest and most important collections of paintings in the world. The origins of the National Gallery date back to 1824 when the British government acquired the art collection of a Russian banker. Generous donations and grants were added over time. The extensive building complex dates back to 1837. Architectural changes have taken place at regular intervals over the course of almost two centuries.

National Gallery in Trafalgar Square

National Gallery in Trafalgar Square


St Martin-in-the-Fields

In Trafalgar Square stands the Anglican Church of St Martin-in-the-Fields, dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours. The church, which was built almost 300 years ago, has the bell tower integrated into the portico as an architectural feature. Anyone who sees the three-aisled church from the inside is impressed by the brightness and the sparse furnishings. St Martin-in-the-Fields is the church of Buckingham Palace and the Admiralty.

St Martin-in-the-Fields


St Martin-in-the-Fields


St Martin-in-the-Fields - Nave


St Martin-in-the-Fields - Nave 


Westminster Cathedral

The London Episcopal Church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Westminster cannot compete with the churches of St Paul's or Westminster Abbey (both Top 10). The cathedral was first used for religious services in 1903. The neo-Byzantine architectural style with the alternating façade of red brick and Portland stone suggests otherwise. The largest Catholic church in England and Wales has four low domes and a freestanding bell tower. Above the portal is a mosaic arch, which is also reminiscent of Byzantine churches.

Westminster Cathedral
Westminster Cathedral - Nave
Westminster Cathedral - Cross above the main altar
Westminster Cathedral - Lady Chapel

Leicester Square

300 meters north of Trafalgar Square (Top 10) we find Leicester Square. The square's name makes the eyes of London film buffs light up. There are several large cinemas in Leicester Square, which draw attention to themselves with film premieres. The square is also a media hub and gateway to London's Chinatown. The heart of London's sprawling Chinese community is best entered through Chinatown Gate on Wardour Street.

Leicester Square
Leicester Square - corner of Coventry Street and Wardour Street
Leicester Square - Wardour Street with the China Gate
Out and about in London's Chinatown

Soho

The trendy district of Soho is located in the West End of the City of Westminster district. In this part of the city, we love Carnaby Street and Regent Street. In the adjoining district of Mayfair is Savile Row, the home of men's bespoke tailors.

Soho-Carnaby Street
Soho - Pub Shakespeare's Head
Regent Street
Men's Tailor on Savile Row

Attractions in the Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

Kensington and Chelsea are among the best residential areas in the capital. When we think of Kensington, we involuntarily think of Kensington Palace and the associated Kensington Gardens as well as Hyde Park (top 10). The domed structure of the Royal Albert Hall, which is used for a wide variety of events, is world-famous. Not to mention the legendary department store Harrods.

Kensington Palace

For centuries, Kensington Palace has been the befitting residential area of ​​British royals. Mary II, Queen of England, Scotland and Wales had the building renovated as a stately residence at the end of the 17th century. The Queen died at the age of 32. Their successors expanded the palace and commissioned additional, lavish state rooms. In the second half of the 18th century, however, Kensington Palace lost its importance. Rulers preferred Buckingham Palace to him. Prince William's family currently occupies part of the palace. Parts of Kensington Palace can be visited.

Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace


Kensington Gardens

Kensington Gardens is one of the eight Royal Parks in London. The 107-hectare site borders Hyde Park. On the western edge is Kensington Palace. Noteworthy is the Round Pond, a lake measuring almost three hectares. Contrary to what the name might suggest, the body of water, which is up to five meters deep, is more oval than round. The lake is a haven for swans and Canada geese.

Between the lake and Kensington Palace stands the monument erected in honor of Queen Victoria.

Kensington Gardens


Kensington Gardens


Kensington Palace with the Queen Victoria Memorial


Kensington Palace with the Queen Victoria Memorial 


Royal Albert Hall and Albert Memorial

On the southern edge of Kensington Gardens stands the Royal Albert Hall, one of Britain's most impressive Victorian buildings. The imposing building was opened more than 150 years ago. The event hall is the commercially usable part of the national memorial in honor of Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. He was the consort of Britain's Queen Victoria. The hall is the venue for various major events. The Royal Albert Hall is famous for the Proms concerts held during the summer months.

Royal Albert Hall - Front
Royal Albert Hall - rear side
Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial - detail

The second part of the memorial is the monumental Albert Memorial. It looms just behind the Royal Albert Hall in Kensington Gardens.
Address Kensington Gore

Harrods

Harrods is one of the most famous and exclusive department stores in the world. You will look in vain for bargains on the 100.000 square meters of retail space. No wonder, the department store was purveyor to the court of the royal family until 2001. Only luxury brands and a reliable credit or debit card count in the house on Brompton Road.

Harrods on Brompton Road
Harrods - Food Hall - Lunch to go
Harrods-Dining Hall
Harrods - Coffee Bar

With the luxury brands distributed over several floors, boredom soon sets in. The food department on the ground floor is completely different. The Art Nouveau "Food Halls" inspire us. The variety of offers is fascinating and the prices are breathtaking. Restaurants and bars invite you to visit. Security personnel at the entrances to the luxury department store ensure that certain standards regarding clothing and backpacks are observed. Harrods is one of London's most visited attractions.

Attractions in the Borough of Southwark

The borough of Southwark is on the right, south bank of the Thames. One of his most famous buildings is Tower Bridge (Top 10). Other sights include the HMS Belfast light cruiser museum ship, The Shard, Borough Market, the Globe Theatre, the neighboring Modern Tate Gallery and the Millennium Bridge. There is enough to see in Southwark for people who are used to exploring metropolises on their own.

Light cruiser HMS Belfast - small cruise ship docking

Light cruiser HMS Belfast - small cruise ship docking


The View from The Shard

The 310 meter high futuristic building "The Shard" is one of Europe's tallest skyscrapers. When the weather is nice, visitors can enjoy fascinating views over London and the wider area from the viewing levels on the 68th and 69th floors. In addition, restaurants and bars offer excellent gastronomy. The Shangri-La Hotel has its home in The Shard. It woos guests with 202 rooms and suites.

The Shard


The Shard


View of The Shard from the Sky Garden London


View of The Shard from the Sky Garden London 


Ticket prices start at £28 (€33) when booked online.

Borough Market

The historic Borough Market has existed for 1.000 years. It is London's oldest food market. In modern times, it is mainly fed by producers. As an encore, there is a large, varied street food area. A must-see for those visiting London staying on the right bank of the Thames.

Borough Market


Borough Market


Borough Market


Borough Market 


If you're already in the area: Not even 200 meters away is the "Golden Hinde", a replica of Francis Drake's ship. Work is underway on the reconstruction of the 37 meter long galleon in St Mary Overie's dry dock. Sir Francis Drake was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the world in the Golden Hinde between 1577 and 1580.

Golden hind

Golden hind


Globe Theater

One of London's cultural attractions is the Elizabethan Globe Theatre. It is next to the Modern Tate on the banks of the River Thames. The half-timbered building specializes primarily in performances of works by William Shakespeare. The origins of the theater date back to 1599. It stood together with other theaters and places of entertainment outside the town. – The rotunda of the more than 3.000-seat theater initially belonged to a community of owners. Shakespeare held a 12,5 percent stake; he was also the house poet of the Globe.

Globe Theater


Globe Theater


Globe Theater


Globe Theater 


In 1642 the Puritan government closed all places of entertainment. The Globe also fell under the measure. The round theater was demolished two years later and fell into oblivion. - In 1997, at the instigation of sponsors, the Globe Theater reopened as an outdoor theater. Like its original, it has a thatched roof. The roof is secured by sprinkler systems and spectator numbers are limited to 1.500. Theater operations are suspended in winter.

Tate Gallery of Modern Art

On the south bank of the Thames is the Tate Gallery of Modern Art (Tate Modern) in an abandoned power station. The gallery is one of the world's largest museums of modern and contemporary art, with branches in Liverpool and St Ives in Cornwall. The Tate Modern shows works by the most important artists of classical modernism and the present. The palette of names ranges from Joseph Beuys to Andy Warhol. The permanent exhibition consists of four segments. There are also special exhibitions in the former turbine hall.

Tate Gallery of Modern Art from the Millennium Bridge

Tate Gallery of Modern Art from the Millennium Bridge


Millennium Bridge

The 325 meter long Millennium Bridge connects the boroughs of the City of London and Southwark. Star architect Norman Foster designed the bridge to mark the turn of the millennium. The pedestrian bridge, which opened in June 2000, initially made the headlines because of uncontrollable vibrations. The vibrations have since been resolved.

Millennium Bridge - in the background St Paul's Cathedral

Millennium Bridge - in the background St Paul's Cathedral


London's sights - one day is not enough

Each of the sights mentioned requires enough time to get an idea of ​​them. In addition, there are other interesting buildings along the way that are not presented here. A day's stay in London alone is not enough. It takes several days to complete “our” sights. We haven't even thought of a recommended visit to Greenwich, the city of the Prime Meridian and the former center of the British Navy.

August 2022

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