A day in Halifax


In September 2014, at 8:00am, our cruise ship makes that Celebrity Summit, at the modern cruise terminal in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Also the Aida Luna has already found her way to Halifax that day. The city can look forward to around 4.000 day visitors.

Halifax - Cruise Terminal

Halifax - Cruise Terminal


Halifax was founded by the English in 1749. The commune is east of Québec and north of Boston the largest city in the territory. Almost 400.000 people live in the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) region. As an important economic and cultural center, the city has a major ice-free port and an international airport.

Celebrity Cruises offers some interesting day tours for the shore leave. Granted, the tours are not cheap, but participants in the excursions are regularly full of praise. A varied trip promises to be "Best of Halifax & Peggy's Cove". First it goes directly to the picturesque fishing town about 45 km away Peggy's Cove. The tour is mainly because of the world famous lighthouse Peggy's Point undertaken. There is only an hour left for the fishing village and the lighthouse before heading back to Halifax. In "Murphy's Waterfront Restaurant" the lobsters are already waiting for the guests. Then the “Maritime Museum of the Atlantic” located within walking distance is headed for. There the participants will be given an insight into Halifax's long maritime life. After the museum, the Halifax Citadel is headed for. This excursion charges the on-board account with US $ 139.

Halifax - Murphy's Waterfront RestaurantHalifax - Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

The shipping company offers tickets for the Big pink bus on. The hop-on hop-off buses start at the cruise terminal and stop at the city's main stations. The company supports a Canadian breast cancer foundation.

Halifax - The Big Pink Sightseeing Buses

Halifax - The Big Pink Sightseeing Buses


We decide to take a walking tour of the historic part of Halifax. It starts in the terminal building of the Halifax Seaport. The modern structure joins the southern end of the Halifax waterfront on. In the lavishly designed complex, not only facilities for cruise passengers, but also exhibition spaces for artists, dealers and a café were created. A museum, a university area and a "Farmers' Market" with regional products give the facility the finishing touches. - Ship guests who would like to do something on their own will receive good information about Nova Scotia in the terminal as well as a plan for a city tour through Halifax and the neighboring sister city Dartmouth.

Taxis and limousines are available for those who want to take a trip further afield. Excursion buses of the “Gray Line” can also be booked directly in the terminal. It is noticeable that the ship's on-board account is debited when purchasing Gray Line tickets. It seems that in Halifax no one should slip through the mesh of the shipping line network.

We recommend starting the Halifax walking tour in reverse order to that shown on the map. This seems more logical to us in terms of the process. Those who follow the plan, however, will possibly book a "free" tour on the Harbourwalk and see little of the city. After leaving the terminal we head for the clearly visible "Westin Hotel". It's up to the Hollis Street. We turn right into it. As soon as the crossing Bishop Street we follow this road to the left.

On the corner of Bishop Street and the crossing Barrington St stands the historical Government House. This is the official residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. He is the chief administrative officer and at the same time representative of the English crown. Construction of the representative stone house began in 1800. When visiting Canada, it is used as a temporary residence for members of the English royal family.

Halifax-Government House

Halifax-Government House


There is an old graveyard on the left side of Barrington Street. A monument commemorates the Crimean War, which lasted from 1853 to 1856. In the battle for the port city held by Russian troops SevastopolFrench, English, Turks and Sardinians fought in united armies. Canadian troops were also deployed on the English side, and the memorial reminded them that they were dead.

Halifax - Cemetery with the Sevastopol Monument

Halifax - Cemetery with the Sevastopol Monument


After Government House and the cemetery, we turn left onto Spring Garden Street. The first goal of our tour has been reached. It's St. Mary's Basilica.

For over 200 years, "Saint Mary's Cathedral Basilica", as its official name is, has been home to the Diocese of Halifax. Construction of the main church began in 1833. The facade and the steeple (58 meters) were designed with white granite. The church is a mixture of Gothic and Georgian architecture. During the construction period, local artisans did not yet have the skills to make a church roof of this size in Halifax. Therefore shipbuilders were hired who could do the complex work at great heights. The construction work lasted decades. The building in its current size was erected in 1869. The church in Trafalgar Square in London served as the building template St Martin-in-the-Fields. In 1950 Pope Pius XII awarded the cathedral the honorary title of a basilica.

Halifax - St Mary's BasilicaHalifax - Interior of the Catholic CathedralHalifax - Interior of the Catholic Cathedral

Past the Provincial Court House and a library building leads the Spring Garden Road dead straight towards the adorable Halifax Public Gardens. The best restaurants, bars and stylish shops in town are on the way.

Halifax - Halifax Memorial LibraryHalifax University BuildingHalifax - Houses on Queen Street

The Public Gardens were designed in the Victorian style beginning in 1866. The garden location offers a lot on 6,8 hectares: A Japanese garden, a pond, a beautiful fountain with allegorical figures, a typical British band stand for Sunday concerts and a pretty café are the main features of the garden architecture. The city garden can be easily explored on winding paths. We leave the Public Gardens at the rear.

Halifax-Public Gardens

Halifax-Public Gardens


 Halifax - Halifax Public GardensHalifax - Group tour of Halifax Public GardensHalifax - Cafe in the Halifax Public GardensHalifax Coat of Arms of Kings College in the Halifax Public GardensHalifax - Bandstand in the Halifax Public GardensHalifax - Fountain system in the Halifax Public Gardens

There the Sackville St past. We follow it because our next destination is the Halifax Citadell. There are also Royal Artillery facilities along the way. Cannons and other war tools from different eras are presented on their premises.

Halifax - 12 pounder gun

Halifax - 12 pounder gun


Perhaps the most important goal of our city tour is the one enthroned on a hill above the city Halifax Citadel. It is one of the "Historic Places of Canada" and one of the most visited historical sites in the country.

Halifax - Junction to the Halifax Citadel

Halifax - Junction to the Halifax Citadel


The citadel is the symbol of the significant role Halifax played as the naval base of the British Empire. At the fort, visitors will learn about Canada's military heritage and the transition from colony to nation. At the same time, you can enjoy panoramic views over Halifax. The Noon Gun is fired at exactly 12:00 noon. This tradition can be traced back at least to the year 1856. The cannon is fired at lunchtime every day, except on Christmas Day. Unfortunately we missed this moment to our regret and only had to be satisfied with a cloud of smoke after the bang. Other pre-visitor activities include the hourly changing of the guard at the main gate and daily performances by the 78th Highlanders' bagpipers and drummers. In the main season in July and August there are daily demonstrations of the handling of shotguns, muskets and cannons.

Halifax - Central building of the Halifax CitadelHalifax - Casemates of the Halifax CitadelHalifax - Masonry of the Halifax CitadelHalifax - Team Fair in the Halifax CitadelHalifax Library in the Halifax CitadelHalifax - A cannon from the Halifax Citadel

The citadel was built to protect the extensive natural harbor of Halifax from attacks from the land side. After the city was founded in 1749, five wooden forts were built. In 1815 it was decided to build a fortress out of solid stone structures. The year 1829 is noted as the start of construction on the citadel. The work was not completed until 1856. After its completion, British regiments were housed in the building. They were regularly replaced after a period of service of 2 to 4 years. In 1906 the fort was handed over to Canadian troops. Since 1935 the citadel has been a “national historical place”. But even in World War II, the facility served Canadian troops as a transit station for foreign missions.

Halifax - Guard on duty at the Halifax Citadel

Halifax - Guard on duty at the Halifax Citadel


Located between the citadel and the lower city center of the historical clock tower from 1803. It was built at the behest of Prince Edward, the Duke of Kent, and is considered one of the typical attractions of Halifax. The Duke of Kent represented the British Crown in Halifax for several years.

Halifax - The historic clock tower from 1803Halifax - The historic clock tower from 1803

Along the Carmichael St let's go straight a few blocks to the historic complex Grand parade. It was originally a military parade ground. In the center is a monument that commemorates the 1.360 citizens of the city who lost their lives during the First World War. An inscription was added afterwards, which also commemorates the dead of the Second World War and the dead of the Korean War.

Halifax - War Memorial on the Grande Parade

Halifax - War Memorial on the Grande Parade


Left hand, d. H. at the north end of the Grande Parade, that is Town hall. It was built between 1887 and 1890. It is one of the oldest and largest public buildings in Nova Scotia. The seven-story clock tower, which shows the dials of a clock to the north and south, is remarkable. On the northern clock face, the time has stopped at four minutes past nine. This is to remind of the explosives explosion on board a cargo ship lying in the port, which destroyed large parts of the city center in 1917.

At the southern end of the square is the Evangelical-Anglican St. Paul's Church. The church, built in 1750, is Canada's oldest Protestant church. It is also the oldest building in the city. In 1787 St. Paul's was made a bishopric. From 1787 to 1864 it served as the Anglican Church's first cathedral outside of Great Britain.

Halifax - St Pauls Church from 1749Halifax - St Pauls Church from 1749 - The central naveHalifax - Canadian Bank of Commerce

At the historic building of the Canadian Bank of Commerce past we stop directly on the lower lying promenade Halifax Harbourwalk to. There we start with the Historical Properties. They are the oldest waterfront warehouses in Canada. They were built between 1800 and 1905. They have now been restored and used for other purposes. The buildings offer space for events, restaurants and shops.

Halifax- Historic PropertiesHalifax - Gallery of Shops in Historic Properties

The actual Halifax Harbourwalk begins at the Historic Properties. There are food stalls, shops and ticket shops lined up. The ferry to Dartmouth and the excursion boats for various tours leave from the Harbourwalk. That lays on the way Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. Its exhibitions focus on Canada's maritime history and the history of the Canadian Navy. Also objects of RMS Titanic and showpieces from the Halifax explosion found their way into the exhibition. In front of the museum, historical ships that have been approved for inspection lie in the shore zone.

Halifax - View of the Halifax HarbourwalkHalifax - Sailor Silva of HalifaxHalifax Excursion DealsHalifax - ticket shops everywhere you lookHalifax - Food stalls on the Halifax HarbourwalkHalifax - HMCS Sackville - The Last Corvette

It is now not far from the museum to the cruise terminal. Lying on the way Bishop's Landing, the emigrant memorial and a statue that pays tribute to the famous shipowner Samuel Cunard.

Halifax - Halifax Harbourwalk at Bishop's LandingHalifax - Emigrant Monument on Halifax HarbourwalkHalifax—Mr. Samuel Cunard

In the terminal is the Pier 21 involved. Prosaic minds refer to them as the "Ellis Island of Canada". After the Second World War, more than 1¼ million people looked for a new home in Canada. Most of the immigrants came through Halifax. The migration movement established Canada's post-war prosperity. A discarded railroad car outside the building still announces the immigrants. Pier 21 is the last remaining Canadian immigration station and now serves as an immigrant museum.

Halifax - Pier 21 - Canadian Museum for ImmigrationHalifax - Pier 21 - With railroad car

We saw a lot of interesting things during our tour of Halifax. At the end there is even time to drink a smooth, dark Canadian beer in the Garrison Brewing Company opposite the terminal. - Everywhere on our tours along the east coast of the USA and Canada we were offered great tasting beers in the places we visited.

Halifax - Garrison Brewing Co.

Halifax - Garrison Brewing Co.


 

 

 

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